Ticket School > Blog > New York > How Many Points Does It Take to Get a Suspended License in NY?
Shot of a traffic cop talking to a young driver

We’ve all been there where we are running late for work or in a hurry to get someplace. We may drive a little faster. Maybe we don’t fully yield at a right-on-red. Then, out of nowhere, a police officer is pulling us over and issuing a ticket.

In New York, the point system is used when you are convicted—found guilty of—a moving violation. If you rack up 11 or more points in an 18-month period, you can say goodbye to your driving privileges, as the DMV will issue a New York State license suspension.

License suspensions can either be definite or indefinite, depending on the moving violations. Definite suspensions have a specific start and end date. Indefinite suspensions do not have an end date. Often, you must complete or do something; once you do, then the DMV will change the indefinite suspension to a definite suspension.

Just keep in mind, getting too many points is not the only way you can have your license suspended or even revoked in New York.

For example, failing to yield the right-of-way earns you three improper turn points on your license. If you were speeding, New York has a sliding scale based on how fast you were going:

  • 1 to 10: 3 Points
  • 11 to 20: 4 Points
  • 21 to 30: 6 Points
  • 31 to 40: 8 Points
  • Over 40: 11 Points

So, if you were speeding by more than 40 mph, that’s 11 points right there, so that means an automatic license suspension.

What Happens if You Drive with a Suspended License?

Driving in New York on a suspended license is never a good idea. It is a criminal offense. It can be either a misdemeanor or felony charge, depending on the circumstances. If convicted and found guilty of the offense, you could face a minimum fine of $200 and 30 days in jail to a maximum fine of $5,000, with a longer period of incarceration.1

How Do You Get Points Removed from Your NY Driving Record?

If you are getting close to 11 points or already exceeded it, you can enroll in a Point and Insurance Reduction Program (PIRP) online defensive driving course. Completing this online course will “forgive” four points from your driving record.

However, those points do not go away, and they do remain on your record. So, if you have 11 points, and you complete your PIRP online driving course, you could receive up to 4 points forgiven, leaving you with only 7 points counted toward any penalties and/or license suspension. Yet, your driving record will still show 11 points.

How Long Do Points Stay on Your NY Driving Record?

The points from a moving violation will remain on your driving record for 18 months, however the violations themselves will continue to show up on your record for up to 4 years.

For example, if you had a moving violation conviction on October 15, 2019. The points would stay on your license until April 15, 2021. The conviction would not fall off until January 1, 2023. New York removes convictions on the 1st of January of the fourth year.

Why Complete My PIRP Online?

Man with car key in car
The primary benefit of completing your PIRP as an online defensive driving course is you can access the content on any device, 24/7, from just about anywhere. You don’t have to rearrange your busy schedule to go sit in a classroom full of people at a set time, either. You can complete it at your own pace from the comfort and safety of your own home, or anywhere with internet access. Best of all, there is no final exam to worry about! The course uses a short quiz at the end of each unit while the information is still fresh on your mind.

To learn more about taking your PIRP online, or to enroll, please feel free to sign up for Ticket School’s Internet Point Insurance Reduction Program (IPIRP) online defensive driving course today! You can register right through the website.  You can call us at (800) 558-9887 if you need assistance or have further questions about our state-approved driving courses.

Source:

  1. https://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/criminal-defense/crime-penalties/driving-suspended-license-new-york